Let the Stones Speak

Let the Stones Speak

Let the Stones Speak brings you archaeology from a biblical perspective. Host Brent Nagtegaal is on location in Jerusalem to give you the most important developments happening on the ground—and emerging from beneath it. Nagtegaal is a contributor for ArmstrongInstitute.org.


And a second “House of David” inscription confirmed

And a new tool in biblical archaeology: archaeomagnetism

Protecting antiquities from looters and illicit markets continues to be a problem in Israel. Yet in the past week, Israel has announced the repatriation of two key discoveries: a First Temple Period papyrus and a silver shekel from the fourth year of the Great Revolt.

This week, host Brent Nagtegaal spoke with Givati dig co-director Dr. Yiftah Shalev about the ivory discovery, as well as other unique biblical-period finds from the excavation.

On today’s program, host Brent Nagtegaal goes to Tel Lachish to talk with excavation director Prof. Yosef Garfinkel about his team’s discoveries at the site from the time of Rehoboam, as well as to preview his new excavations set to begin on June 26, 2022.

On today’s program, host Brent Nagtegaal takes you on a tour of Gezer, highlighting the latest evidence supporting Solomonic-period construction.

The upcoming excavation at Shiloh may reveal the resting place of the biblical tabernacle, says dig director Dr. Scott Stripling.

History records several major, famous conflicts that took place during the same chronological window as the Hebrew Bible. Yet for various reasons, these battles are not mentioned in the Bible. Or are they?

Is the biblical description of “Philistines” prior to the 12th century B.C.E.—in fact, over half a millennium earlier—evidence of biblical fable? Many modern scholars believe it is. On today’s podcast, host Brent Nagtegaal interviews Christopher Eames to examine how the textual evidence from the Bible itself answers the question.

Debate over events aside, the detailed, eyewitness-style, Egyptianized language within the Torah points clearly to an Israelite experience in Egypt.