French far-right party Front National candidate Marine Le Pen celebrates during her party’s election night rally after the first round of the 2012 French presidential election on April 22. Le Pen won 18.2 percent in the first round of the French presidential election, the highest-ever score for her anti-immigrant party.(Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images)
French far-right party Front National candidate Marine Le Pen celebrates during her party’s election night rally after the first round of the 2012 French presidential election on April 22. Le Pen won 18.2 percent in the first round of the French presidential election, the highest-ever score for her anti-immigrant party.
(Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe’s Far Right: From Fringe to Mainstream

April 23, 2012  •  From theTrumpet.com
The far right shocks the world in France. A leading German politician says Islam ‘does not belong in Germany.’ Views that were once considered extreme are the new normal in Europe.
 

Anti-immigration and anti-Islam policies are now mainstream in Europe. A few years ago, they came only from fringe groups. The Party for Freedom (pvv) in the Netherlands, Jobbik in Hungary and Future of Austria (bzö), for example, shocked politicians across the Continent, coming from nowhere, while more established parties languished.

It was a radical shift in European politics. But since then, Europe has gone through another shift, even more radical.

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