NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite image of Hurricane Sandy battering the U.S. East Coast on Monday, October 29. Sandy was moving north-northwest at 20 mph with maximum sustained winds at 85 mph. Tropical storm-force winds extend almost 500 miles from the center, making those winds 1,000 miles in diameter. 
(NASA GOES Project Text: NASA/Rob Gutro/flickr)
NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite image of Hurricane Sandy battering the U.S. East Coast on Monday, October 29. Sandy was moving north-northwest at 20 mph with maximum sustained winds at 85 mph. Tropical storm-force winds extend almost 500 miles from the center, making those winds 1,000 miles in diameter.
(NASA GOES Project Text: NASA/Rob Gutro/flickr)

A History-Making Storm—With a Valuable Lesson

October 29, 2012  •  From theTrumpet.com
 

It’s been called the “perfect storm,” a “Frankenstorm,” a “superstorm” and the “storm of the century.” On Monday morning, the outer arms of Hurricane Sandy were slamming a 1,000-mile stretch of America’s Eastern Seaboard.

According to meteorologists, there is no known precedent for this history-making monster of a storm. Coming just days before the election, and with billions of dollars’ worth of damage already sustained, Sandy has the potential to change the course of history in America.

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